Every Paragraphs Needs a Hook

Great Performances

A Dash of Style says paragraphs must be connected and independent. In order to accomplish this, the closing and opening sentences must inconspicuously act as hooks.” In a paper on King Lear, my professor told me my closing and opening sentences were too “list like.” Plainly going from A to B. For this assignment I wanted to make the closing and opening lines less conspicuous hooks.

Old Paragraph: Lear wants Regan to take on his cause, to take action that will benefit him. Shakespeare is using these first two causes to depict Lear as an entitled character who wants his children to flatter and provide for him.

The next “cause” comes from Kent saying that Lear has “Cause to plain” Ior complain (3.1.39). Lear is on the moors during the storm, suffering under the elements, beginning his transformation to a more humble and self-sacrificing man. Compared to the first causes, Lear now has a reasonable reason to complain.

New: Lear wants Regan to take on his cause, to take action that will benefit him. Shakespeare is using these first two causes to depict Lear as an entitled character who wants his children to flatter and provide for him.

The moment Lear is on the moors however, suffering under the elements, he begins his transformation to a more humble and self-sacrificing man. Compared to the first causes, Lear now has a reasonable reason to complain. Kent says that Lear has “Cause to plain” or complain (3.1.39).

Old: Shakespeare placed this “cause” in the center of the play, almost on the center page, representing nihilism closing in on either side, making everything seem doomed to meaninglessness.

But this isn’t the theme of the play. Shakespeare is still leading the reader to the final “cause.” The next “cause” is found when Lear, referring to his cruel daughters, wonders “If there is any cause in nature that make hard hearts?” (3.6.76). Or in other words, while the cause of thunder seems random, now Lear wonders if nature creates cruelty.

New: Shakespeare placed this “cause” in the center of the play, almost on the center page, representing nihilism closing in on either side, making everything seem doomed to meaninglessness.

But there is hope. Shakespeare leads the reader from nihilism to the final “cause” when Lear, referring to his cruel daughters, wonders “If there is any cause in nature that make hard hearts?” (3.6.76).

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